Study: Arguing with Your Spouse Could Make You Fat

Study: Arguing with Your Spouse Could Make You Fat
Wed 29-10-2014

Fighting with your partner and depression caused by a relationship can make you put on a few pounds.

Researchers found men and women with a history of depression who had especially heated arguments with their spouse burned fewer calories after a meal than less argumentative couples.

Men and women with a history of depression, and who had especially heated arguments with their spouse, burned fewer calories after a meal than less argumentative couples.

These couples also had higher levels of insulin, which contributes to the storage of fat, and spikes of triglycerides - a form of fat in the blood - after eating a heavy meal when compared to participants without these risk factors.

Lead researcher Jan Kiecold-Glaser, from Ohio State University, said the findings reveal how important it is to treat mental health problems.

The new study backs up her previous research, which found that women who are stressed put on weight because their metabolism slows down, burning 100 fewer calories a day.

People who think their partner is unsupportive are more likely to develop heart disease, a study has found.

Scientists at the University of Utah found people who say their spouse is sometimes supportive but also sometimes upsetting have higher levels of artery calcification.