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What to Never Text a Bride-to-Be About

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What to Never Text a Bride-to-Be About

Is your friend, colleague, sister, or cousin getting married? Do you want to be helpful and not get on her nerves? Then we advise you to avoid sending texts to the bride-to-be, especially during the last week or so, so you can stay on her good side.

A bride-to-be can feel stressed out or awkward by very common questions or comments. The last thing you want to do is to send a bride something she rolls her eyes to!

Brides.com shared some text which brides-to-be hate receiving; so here are 4 things you should not send a bride-to-be:

1. "It's not my style, but if you like it..."

If the bride-to-be sends you a picture of her wedding venue or the dress she wants, please don't spoil the moment or cause her to second guess her decision by responding with negativity. Maybe it's not your style, but if her message makes it clear she's thrilled about it, do your best to be a good friend and say something positive.

2. "OMG congrats on the engagement! Can't wait for the wedding now!"

Unless you're super tight with the bride-to-be, never, ever assume you're invited to her wedding.

3. "Saw you were doing [insert workout plan here]. Have you lost any weight yet?"

Just because a bride-to-be uses the hashtag #sweatingforthewedding like, a billion times and is vocal on social media about doing exercise, doesn't mean you have the right to text her such a personal question. Ask her how she likes the workout program and if she would recommend it to others, not how much weight she has lost so far.

4. "Hey, just got the save the date. Is [insert name here] invited too? Just wondering!"

Texting the bride-to-be regarding a plus-one right after she sends out her save the dates can be awkward. If the information is absolutely necessary in order for you to make travel arrangements, for example, wait until you can speak with the bride in person and then gently approach the topic.